Since 1904 the American Dairy Goat Association has been serving the dairy goat industry.

ADGA

Serving the Dairy Goat Industry Since 1904!

 
About Dairy Goats
General Information Print E-mail

Domestic goats along with sheep are humankind's oldest domesticated species dating back some 10,000 years. For thousands of years, goats have been used for their milk, meat, hair, and skins over much of the world. In the last century they have also gained some popularity as pets.

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Care and Management of Dairy Goats Print E-mail

The dairy goat's popularity continues to increase rapidly as more people discover the dairy goat's appeal, utility and productiveness. The female dairy goat is a doe; the male, a buck; the young, kids; and a castrated male, a wether. Their life span is eight to twelve years. Some of the basics to know about the care and management of dairy goats are:

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Dairy Goat Management Calendar Print E-mail

The tasks of raising dairy goats is a year round effort. What to do and when to do it? Here's a year round guide written by Mary Blankevoort, DVM, to help you...

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Parts of a Dairy Goat Print E-mail

For illustrations of the different parts of a dairy goat, look here...

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Milking Dairy Goats Print E-mail

On a worldwide basis, more people drink the milk of goats than any other single animal. A dairy doe should be milked in the same manner as a dairy cow, using good dairy hygiene. Does may be milked by hand or machine. The milk requires the same careful attention to cleanliness and cooling as any other milk.

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Dairy Goat Breeding Print E-mail

Dairy goats are usually seasonal breeders. Most breeding occurs in late summer through early winter. The goat has an 18-21 day estrus cycle or "season." The doe's "season" lasts from a few hours to two or three days. The gestation period is five months. Twins are common, but single or triplet births are not rare. A doe milks approximately ten months following kidding, then is held dry for two months before her next freshening.

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How to Tattoo a Dairy Goat Print E-mail

Success in securing a lasting tattoo mark depends entirely upon the operator. A few simple rules must be observed:

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Dairy Goat Export Marketing Print E-mail

The developing world has a demand for breeding goats from the United States. The most frequently requested breeds are Alpines, Saanens, and Nubians. Our goat industry has marketing advantages over many other countries by offering records from organized programs such as DHIR Linear Appraisal and our competitive shows, which do not exist in most other countries.

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State Contacts For Starting a Grade A/B Goat Dairy Print E-mail

Deciding to turn a hobby goat herd into a working dairy can seem like a daunting task. On the other hand, by contacting the right people the job can become easier. The first place you should go is your state’s dairy division. They have the rules and regulations to live by as well as great advice on everything from equipment to marketing. Most importantly, they are there to help.

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Johne's Disease Print E-mail

Johne’s (“YO-knees”) disease is a fatal gastrointestinal disease of goats and other ruminants (including cattle, sheep, elk, deer, and bison) that is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Also known as paratuberculosis, this infection is contagious, which means it can spread in your herd.

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